BROUGHT TO METS FANS BY
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WHO’S GREAT IN ’68?
If you wanted to know who led the 1967 Mets in batting average, home runs or RBIs, the 1968 Press-TV-Radio Guide had you covered. (The answer to all three? Tommy Davis.)
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WHAT’S IN THE CONTRACT
The Mets sat in the basement of the National League in their first six seasons. Gil Hodges, a former Mets player and Dodgers legend, took over as manager in 1968 with hopes to reverse the team’s fortu ...
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CHARLES IN CHARGE
Ed Charles closed out his MLB career as a Met, bringing a veteran presence to the team during their run to the postseason. It’s possible he wore these cleats in 1969, when he played the hot corner in ...
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A PAIR OF ACES
Two rookie hurlers took the mound for the Mets in 1968: Jerry Koosman and Nolan Ryan. Koosman was an All-Star and finished in a close second place in NL Rookie of the Year voting. Ryan recorded 133 st ...
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AL WEIS GOES TO BAT FOR THE METS
In 1968, his first season as a Met, Al Weis made 301 plate appearances and ended up with a .172 batting average. Admittedly, Weis was known more for his defense than his offense, but his bat would del ...
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AL WEIS IN THE SWINGING SIXTIES
Al Weis made his Mets debut in 1968 after being traded from the Chicago White Sox. The switch-hitter played in 90 games, recording 47 hits, 15 runs and 14 RBIs.
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PORTRAIT OF A WINNER, 1968
When the Mets named Gil Hodges as manager for the 1968 season, they gave him a blank canvas to work with. In no time at all, Hodges shaped the Mets into league contenders and the transformation result ...
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ED CHARLES’S CHAMPIONSHIP RUN
Ed Charles was already a veteran player when he joined the Mets in 1967 at age 34.  The veteran was still pretty light in his cleats, though, notching 279 games, 214 hits and 13 stolen bases in his th ...